CLIMB WALES

Rock Climbing Courses and Mountain Guides in Snowdonia, North Wales

Improvised Rescue

Courses in Snowdonia, North Wales

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Improvised Rescue

Coming Soon!

This page is currently under construction. If you'd like to book a course then please send us a message or come back soon as new content is being added every day. We hope to have the website finished by the end of Spring 2019.

Is Improvised Rescue Right for Me?

These rock climbing courses have been designed in such a way that each course builds on the skills developed during the course before it. Depending on your experience and/or confidence, you could jump straight into, for example, sea cliff or multi-pitch climbing, however, we recommend completing our rock climbing courses in the following sequence:

This sequence of climbing courses gives a natural progression, each course building on the skills developed in the one before it. We do not stipulate this as a requirement, but completing the courses in this order will give you more time to absorb and develop the skills learnt before progressing onto something more challenging. Rather than being put into a situation you are not comfortable with, you will instead gradually develop confidence and proficiency and as result develop into a more well-rounded climber.

What will I Learn?

The list below explains the main learning objectives for this Improvised Rescue course.

Abseiling

A small image of a person abseiling[ Learn More... ]
A large image of a person abseiling

Abseiling is the act of descending a rope, usually to get back down a cliff, or to get to the bottom of a sea cliff in order to start a climb. A friction device, commonly a belay device, is used to control the descent speed. On this course you will learn how to abseil safely, taking into consideration what happens in the event of an emergency such as the rope getting jammed in the belay device or a rock falling on you mid abseil.

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Abseiling as a pair

A small image of two people abseiling together[ Learn More... ]
A large image of two people abseiling together

Sometimes it is necessary for two people to abseil together. Perhaps because a climber has injured themselves, or a parent abseiling with their child, or a more experienced climber abseiling with a novice. On this course you will learn the techniques used when abseiling as pair and how to deal with any problems that might arise.

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Ascending a rope

A small image of a rope ascender[ Learn More... ]
A large image of a rope ascender

Being able to ascend a rope is an important skill to learn when retreat down a cliff is not an option. This skill is often used at sea cliffs to quickly escape an incoming tide, or, in the event of a fall, usually at an overhanging cliff, where a climber is left dangling in space on the end of the rope.

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Belaying

A small image of two children climbing[ Learn More... ]
A large image of two children climbing

Belaying is the act of holding a rope for a climbing partner. So that a climber doesn't hit the ground when they fall, they attach themselves to a rope. When they fall, they fall onto the rope and the rope takes their weight. Climbing is done in pairs as there needs to be somebody at the opposite end of the rope to keep hold of it. The person holding the rope is known as the belayer.

Rather than holding the rope directly, the belayer uses a belay device attached to their climbing harness to add friction and make it easier to hold the rope. A belay device makes it possible to hold the weight of a falling climber.

There are many types of belay devices available. Some are specific to different types of climbing, some accommodate one rope, some are intended for use with two ropes, and there are many specialist devices available. Knowing which one to use, and how to use it correctly, in any given situation is fundamental to climbing safely.

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Conservation

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At Climb Wales we take conservation seriously and this is embedded in all of the climbing and mountaineering courses that we offer. One of the many great things about climbing is interaction with nature. During the course we will look at how to minimise impact and ensure that future generations will be able to enjoy the same luxuries as we do.

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Equipment

A small image showing a selection of climbing equipment[ Learn More... ]
A large image showing a selection of climbing equipment

During the course you will learn to use a variety of climbing equipment. There are some aspects of equipment which are universal to all disciplines of climbing, such as climbing shoes, harness, helmet, ropes, belay devices and carabiners. Some items are specific to a particular discipline though and won't be the focus of other climbing courses, for example, during our multipitch climbing courses we will look at twin and half ropes but it's unlikely that these will be the focus of any of our other courses. On the sea cliff climbing course you will learn to use jumars and prusiks. And on the single pitch trad climbing course you will learn to place nuts, cams and hexes.

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Escaping the system

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What do you do if you're belaying from above and you accidentally dislodge a rock which knocks your climbing partner unconscious? Lower them down? What if the rope isn't long enough for your partner to reach safe ground or you're on a sea cliff? Sometimes, it is important to be able to escape the system, usually involving climbing out of your harness with your belay device still attached, so that you can aid your partner or call for help. On this course you will learn how to escape the system safely without putting your partner in further peril.

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Jargon

A small image of a climber climbing holding onto a boulder with his heels[ Learn More... ]
A large image of a climber climbing holding onto a boulder with his heels

"I've got no friends and my nuts are too small" is a phrase that many climbers have found themselves shouting down to their climbing partners. Snatch the Gaston, Undercling the flatty, Flag into an Egyptian, Dyno to the Crimper, Mantle on the Sloper and get ready to Dog the Flash... By the end of this course you will speak climbing lingo with the best of them.

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Knots

A small image of some climbing knots[ Learn More... ]
A large image of some climbing knots

Knots are an integral part of climbing and an extremely important link in a chain intended to keep us alive. For sport climbing the most important knot is the figure-eight, for multipitch and trad we extend the use of knots further with clove and Italian hitches, prusiks, bowlines and more. As part of this climbing course you will learn to tie and inspect knots appropriate to the discipline of climbing and how to ensure their safety.

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Placing Protection

A small image of a climbing nut placed into a crack[ Learn More... ]
A large image of a climbing nut placed into a crack

To prevent a falling climber from hitting the floor, climbers periodically place climbing equipment into natural rock features as they climb. In the event of a fall, the equipment catches the rope and minimise the distance of a fall. On this course you will learn about how to place a variety or protection in different scenarios, the types of placements to avoid, and how to get creative when it seems like there is no way of protecting the next part of the climb.

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Protecting a second

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When leading a climb it is easy to focus too much on protecting yourself and not enough on making the climb safe for your partner who will climb behind you. On this climbing course you will learn about the situations where problems arise and how to avoid them.

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Prusiks

A small image of a prusik wrapped around a rope[ Learn More... ]
A large image of a prusik wrapped around a rope

Prusiks are an important part of the equipment arsenal and as they weigh so little so be present on almost any rack. On this course you will learn about the different types of prusiks and how to protect an abseil, to ascend a rope, to assist a belay and a host of other uses for prusiks.

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Retrieving a rope

A small image of a rope stuck half way up a cliff[ Learn More... ]
A large image of a rope stuck half way up a cliff

After abseiling on your rope it is necessary (unless on a sea cliff) to retrieve your rope so that it can be used again. On this course we learn how to rig belays so that the rope moves freely and how to avoid getting the rope caught.

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Ropes

A small image showing a bundle of climbing ropes[ Learn More... ]
A large image showing a bundle of climbing ropes

There are many types of ropes used in climbing; dynamic ropes, static ropes, single ropes, twin ropes, half ropes, hybrids, and many different weights and thicknesses from a number of manufacturers. During this climbing course you will learn to decide which rope to use for ta particular type of climbing.

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Throwing the rope

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When rigging an abseil from the top of the cliff it's important to make sure the rope reaches the ground. As part of this course you will learn a number of techniques to ensure this happens and how to recognise potential problems.

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Traversing

A small image of a climber traversing across a cliff[ Learn More... ]
A large image of a climber traversing across a cliff

Traversing is the name given to climbing sideways. Often in climbing you will find that the way above is bared, perhaps by a large overhanging obstacle, and the climber will therefore having to climb sideways to avoid the obstacle. Doing so can create a number of problems if it isn't managed correctly both for the lead climber and their climbing partner. On this climbing course you will learn how to traverse safely and avoid the problems which can arise.

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ROCK CLIMBING COURSES AND MOUNTAIN GUIDING IN SNOWDONIA NORTH WALES

Rock Climbing Courses and Mountain Guiding in Snowdonia North Wales